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What's up with the 2.0?

Well... If I was being more accurate, this would really be 4.0.

In the beginning, there was Brian Duff's Weblog over on Radio Userland (good grief, that wasn't even Web 1.0. You had to install a thick client application just to post. Yowzers), then I set up Orablogs, and moved over to there. Until fairly recently, I blogged (or rather, mostly didn't out of laziness) at blogs.oracle.com.

So why move now?

Well. I got a wee bit frustrated with the blog management software I was using - it had a troublesome tendency to mangle Java code in particular, which is something of a pain when you're trying to write a Java coding related blog. So far, I'm pretty happy with blogger.com's interface.

Another reason for the move is that I want to blog about more random stuff outside the world of Oracle. For instance, if I decide to play with Eclipse or JBoss (perish the thought), blogs.oracle.com doesn't really feel like the appropriate place. Even though my blog there tries not to be, like most corporate blogging sites, blogs.oracle.com suffers from the perception that the bloggers thereon are corporate marketing drones. OK, it's not just a perception - it might just about be true in some cases... .

A third reason is that I've owned this domain name (dubh.org) since about the time I finished university, and never did anything useful with it. Now, thanks to Rob, I'm totally in love with Google Apps and am using it to host all manner of fun stuff at the dubh.org domain. By the way, feel free to drop me an email at brian@dubh.org to say hi.... good grief... it's liberating being able to post mailto: links again safe in the knowledge that gmail's spam filters will deal with most of the crud ;).

Having a blog on my own domain also means that should I (perish the thought) ever move on to new pastures, I don't have to say adios to all of my blog content...

Comments

  1. Hi Brian. I've only recently started blogging but you may like to take a look at ScribeFire. It's a very nice little Firefox plugin which I use when updating my blog. The biggest benefit for me is that I don't have to keep logging in and out of Blogger.

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