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Preferential treatment? - netbeans

Well well... Bug 6182905 was open for 2.5 years, but now it's a NetBeans P1 issue (ala bug 6511815), and whoa... it suddenly got fixed. All Java applications are created equal, just some moreso than others.

Personally, I'm just glad it got fixed at all... This one often crops up as one of our "random but frequent exceptions from Java core libraries".

[This post is somewhat tongue in cheek in case you're wondering... Though I'm just a wee bit grumpy about the fact that apparently there's "almost no chance" bug 6510914 will ever get fixed... roll on open source java ;) ]

Comments

  1. Well, I guess there are some poeple from SUN working in the netbeans team and they do not hesitate to fix such things themselves.

    IIRC registered could already checkout the source, fix a bug and propose the solution during the development process of Java6. However, I believe there is no way anymore besides for Java7 at jdk7.java.net.

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